Text Games - Exploring Worlds In Text

By Christopher Davis

The earth itself is a beautiful place, but the beauty is limited by what we make of it and how we interact with the planet. In text games, when you explore, the world is breath taking; masterpieces of description that are only confined by the depth of your imagination. What was once extinct can come alive again and the impossible can become reality in these text adventure games. You only need to open your mind to the boundless impending possibilities within these text games . Everything from exotic animals and plant life to ancient architecture that leave your brain drooling.

New areas in your favorite text based rpg or MUD (multi-user dungeon) are waiting to be explored. As you read and see what there is to see through the eyes of your character in these text games, you will find it very difficult not to get caught up in the world. Other avenues exist in games like combat and skills, but through the environment around you it casts a spell of magic that has you escaping from the monotony of everyday life. Reality is uniform and eventually you become accustomed to the similar scenery that surrounds you. Worlds in text games provide a level of variety as well as detail that cannot be matched. Not even graphic based games compare to text games because of the limitations involved with what can be programmed. By using your ability to imagine, you can create intricate scenes in your mind that are unrivaled by any means of technology.

Fantasy molds the story and the people you will come into contact with in these text games. Quests allow you to meet denizens that request help of you in exchange for items or other rewards. By investing your time in this feature of a text based rpg game, you are able to interact more with your environment. It allows you to learn more about the areas you explore and the culture that is unique to the inhabitants of the online text game. While it may be simple to just strike down another creature or person with a weapon, it is more beneficial to you if you look into all avenues open to you. Sometimes using your mouth instead of a fist can provide the potential for more gold in your pack in these text games. Be careful though, while you may be curious of others the very same people you seek to meet may be hostile towards you, so keep your hand close to your sword while playing these online text games.

The amount of ways you can change the world around you in text games are endless. You have the option to choose how you want to approach those you meet and the setting you find yourself in. You will never hear the term linear thrown around, or have to expect a series of closing credits. Text adventure games are like novels that continue until you decide to put them down. A small sense of accomplishment to be had is through rising in the ranks of explorers, which in turn might even have you attempting this outside of the text game world.

While the rush you may get from unleashing attacks on other adventurers may be great, the amount of knowledge and exploration to be had in the fantasy text games world around you is far greater. Be open to all opportunities given, because exploring worlds in online text games is incomparable to anything else.

Become properly addicted by trying out some great RPG text games.

Christopher K Davis is a text game enthusiast and currently plays games from http://www.IronRealms.com.

Comments

I like how this article was written. It was an interesting read. Exploring the world in the game is one of my favorite things to do. I love to see how the descriptions change from area to area. For that reason also I tend to take exploring at a bit of a slow pace to get a good visual image in my mind as I read. Exploring is a great way to pass the time as well.

It is a very nice written article with several good points. I think the major issue is that exploring to most people in a text game is to walk around and get a feel for the map. I think far too few actually take in the scenery (room descriptions) beyond just major things that might be there (a statue, fountain, etc...) The downside to this is that the more prevalent it is, the designers may get lazier about creating them, and that would be a shame. To IRE's credit, I haven't seen this happening in one of their games yet.

You make some excellent points.

When a new area is found the first thing you want to do is explorer every room. but just walking into a place to up your explorer rank may be nice and all but you don't get the picture of what you are walking past. it is just text to you. Stop and look at the what is there, see the world, be in awe at what the fates/gods have created for you to see.

Next time you find yourself bored, go to your favorite place and look at what is round you again. you may even find yourself surprised.

Yes. This article pretty much sums up what I always try to tell people regarding MUDs. While I personally haven't played much more than Lusternia, within that game alone I can't help but be in awe at the amazing descriptive language. It has served not only to entertain me, but to actually improve my own writing as well.

These games take the undertaking of opening up a world for you using words alone. Indeed, it is a masterful use of literature to incorporate it with the fundamentals of a video game in order to make a very rich and interactive world.

Almost like the real world, the worlds in MUDs are vast and nuanced. You'll find thousands of different breath-taking environments, villages and cities with their own intriguing cultures, and a feeling of real, breathing, living places before you.

No two cities are the same at all. For example, in Lusternia, there is New Celest - shining industrialized city that reveres the light. Then you have Magnagora, manifestly different the second you turn in and see the dank city corridors and the grim sight of a hanging corpse overhead. And it doesn't just have the cliche "dark" and "light" cities like I just described. There's Hallifax with its highly advanced society, fractals and unique structures. And then there's Gaudiguch, a city that aims to seek enlightenment, located near the mountains where an eternal flame blazes at its centre.

And there's just so much more. When you consider that there are several different planes with their own worlds that unfold before your very eyes, you'll realize that even in a text-game the world can be a pretty big place.

Besides indulging in the beautiful picture of your text surroundings through your imagination, text games also do far more than what have been brought up above. I have known people who have improved in their mastery of English and widened their outlet of creativity because IRE, however indirect, encourages it. Mind you, there are many different ways in which IRE also helps one in - some aspects of the game stimulates our use of English and philosophical views of ideals within the game. It promotes a thinking mind in a way I don't believe graphic games can provide!

I have seen these very things first hand. Having my oldest son sitting on my lap reading the room descriptions has made a huge impact on  his vocabulary and imagination. It has been wonderful.

"The earth itself is a beautiful place, but the beauty is limited by what we make of it and how we interact with the planet. In text games, when you explore, the world is breath taking; masterpieces of description that are only confined by the depth of your imagination. What was once extinct can come alive again and the impossible can become reality in these text adventure games. You only need to open your mind to the boundless impending possibilities within these text games . Everything from exotic animals and plant life to ancient architecture that leave your brain drooling. "

I like this part of the article because it is correct in saying RPG text games allow people to explore the various creatures which are considered extinct or figments of imagination in real life. Like in Lusternia, beasts range from the golden dragon turtles, slithering wyrms, shimmering thunderbirds, fiery phoenixes, ferocious wyverns, hairy mammoths, majestic hippogriffs, bizaare chimaeras, marvelous pegasi and more. I've also seen customised beasts like water dragons, a mutant kitty (yep!), a midnight eagle, a sphinx, and a prehistoric looking man bound in chains by Prav! I wonder then what sort of creatures will I be encountering in the future, a sirrush or an amphisbaena perhaps?

The great thing about exploring in Achaea is all the ways you can interact with the environment to explore hidden areas; areas that you would never find if you didn't read the room descriptions. Folks who know where to "put key in recess" and "pull lever" in Moghedu know what I mean! Every room description really pulls you into the fantasy of the game, because IRE has very strict standards on what it expects from its builders - and it definitely pays off. I've always wanted to apply for mortal builder, but I can never find the motivation to crank out the requirements. I wish there was an area in Achaea that forced you to use stealth instead of violence - like crouching behind barrels when enemies passed, and stuff. A "sneak" skill could even be introduced to the game! Walk around an area without (hopefully) being detected by mobs!

Writing has always been a skill that I practice, though my skill level right now pales in comparison to how IRE writes up descriptions for anything in existence in its universe. It has helped me a lot in thinking up my own fiction, though it's not something I'm going to pursue as a career. In fact, whatever inspiration I get from the descriptions I see partly is a reason why I keep coming back to Achaea, and to any IRE game. It offers a world where you can enjoy words AND learn how to create a world of your own. I hope everyone finds as much fun and personal learning as I do when they play.

If you think about it in depth, imagination is what creates what we do. Imagine you are writing your very own story, and as you emerge from powerful points of the game, you are creating your own legacy that others can either read or follow.

I find that imagination best suits the game in general. I imagine myself a powerful leader, but well trained and ready to take on the day. Sometimes, I even us my imagination to make it seem like I am much more than what I am. I enjoy the aspect of going to places I've never gone to before, interacting with new beings and characters, and immerse myself in a society thats far deeper than unusual.

Yep, imagination plays a fairly high end role in Achaea!

I love designing environments, so for me the fact we can not only have our own manses but also design them from the ground up is just awesome. The styles represented in the game all are displayed excellently, so it will be a fun challenge to make something that can match up to that. I'm really in love with Magnagora's style and I want to take that base and add my own touches when creating my own manse, shop, and aethership. This being in text will be a new and unique challenge, but by simply walking around the world you're already learning from the best.

Text games such as Achaea have a very unique and special way of making the environment a very significant part of a player's experience. While the given environment, descriptions, and objects give a player a better sense of what kind of world they are experiencing, what makes text games so unique is the the color schemes to the text and the responses given from them. The player is fully immersed and ever interacting with the world around him/her, all in real time. Whether you are trying to see past the heavy white blizzards, or carefully walking through a dense red toxic cloud, the carefully selected color schemes and your freedom to choose how you react to it is absolutely amazing. Just as the article states, everything has a potential to change or be changed, including yourself. This to me is what makes text games truly unique and different from reading a book through someone else's eyes. While these descriptions and environments are all part of one's imagination, you may find yourself reacting in a much similar way like you would as if it were really happening to you.

Strange, how text games still strive to battle graphics games for the primary human sense - Vision. Now don't get me wrong, I think that text games whoop graphics like a fifth-grade bully when it comes to vision, but actually on the other four senses there is /literally/ no competition. When's the last time you played ANY graphics game and you were so immersed that you could smell the flowers as you laid in wait for you nemesis in a poppy field, or taste the bile as you were disembowelled by an orc?

Text games drag us into the world of the 'author' and treat all 5 senses. How are you gonna top that, World of Warcraft?

Dear IRE:

This article reads like it was written by a robot or a seventh grader. The repetition of the phrase "these text games" and other similar constructions is extremely monotonous, and shows a lack of understanding of proper composition.

I have previously commented that your articles lack proofreading, and at least this one is slightly better in that regard, but there are still sentence fragments and strange grammatical constructions throughout:

"Everything from exotic animals and plant life to ancient architecture that leave your brain drooling." -- What?

"Other avenues exist in games like combat and skills, but through the environment around you it casts a spell of magic that has you escaping from the monotony of everyday life." -- What?

Please, if you're going to argue that MUDs foster creativity, imagination, and intelligence, I beg of you to display those qualities in the articles you post on the site.

Thanks.

nice article

but when I do, I am pleasantly surprised

One of the few interesting articles.

If you are playing a text game, I think it is appreciative if you read all the roomd descriptions, as they are the hard word of someone somewhere. Many of them are fascinating and beautiful and can even hide secrets for the attentive. Exploring the game isn't just about punching in cardinal directions, it's about taking in the scenery, too.

I always think of Achaea as reading and being a character in a never ending book.

+1

Really nice point of view!

Yes

Nice article

I think the most beautiful room and denizen descriptions I have found would be in Morindar, the Mirror Caves, the Tower of Falaq'tor, and whatever that section of the Vasnari Mountains is called that has the girl sorceress.

Exploring leads to questing, and questing leads to really interesting NPC interactions, for me. Plus, some of the writing is both lovely and humorous (favourite room being Between a Roc and a hard place).

leads us to belive that things are far more dynamic than they really are. In the end, you are still at the whim of a builder of some kind before you can explore more of the game.

I find that when exploring a new/old area, taking time to read the full descriptions helps with the immersion within the game as well as helps stimulate your imagination. I really appreciate builders and all the work that goes into making areas.

i really like exploring. Now I have left only places I dont have access to.. Its going to be tricky and hard to reach the top.

I wouldn't recommend one to anyone.

 

little things in the desc help me map it in my mind, some rooms share identical names but have a different desc! though, for those of you who actually use MAP I recommend reading it just to honor those who wrote it :D

it's really one of the best parts. I enjoy knowing my way around, even if it is only ever tapping a few keys on a keyboard.